Footwork

May 20th, 2009 by Darrin Schenck

by Darrin Schenck

One of the readers asked a question about footwork to the shots from the proper court position. One of the best features of this court position (aside from the obvious advantages mentioned in the Court Position posting) is that you can use very set footwork patterns to cover each shot.

Here is the secret:

Always lead with the foot that is closest to the ball. It is strange, but almost every sport teaches you to cross over first, and then step towards the ball (or base, opponent, whichever is applicable). Since a racquetball court is always a finite amount of space, you need to teach yourself to lead with the foot closest to the ball, and then cross over. It will take some practice, but be much more efficient once you get the hang of it.

For example, if you begin in the position shown in the diagram denoting proper court position, and you are in the defensive position marked “X”, you would step with your left foot, and then cross over with your right foot to cover a shot hit down the line by your opponent. Not only is it more efficient (faster) but your feet will already be set to hit the backhand you will hit in response to your opponents shot. Think about it, walk through it, practice it ,and trust me once you get it, you will be far more efficient in your footwork and court coverage.

picture-8

As discussed in the body of this posting, a right handed player in correct defensive position would step with his LEFT foot first, and then cross over with his RIGHT to cover a down the line shot from his opponent.  This will not only be more efficient, but it will have your feet set when you arrive to hit this shot.  This will give you more options in your response to this shot from your opponent.

Good Luck!

Darrin Schenck

ASU Racquetball Head Coach

Author of Percentage Racquetball and

Racquetball 101, both available through

Racquetball Warehouse

Posted in Racquetball Tips | 212 Comments »

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